Standing on Holy Ground: Nurses, Suffering, and Values

Teaching students is always a pleasure and a privilege. Yet, sometimes the stories that have been the most powerful for me seem to have no impact on them. Today I read them an excerpt from Mary Elizabeth O’Brien’s book, Spirituality in Nursing. Sr. Macrina advised,

“if you should ever hear God speaking to you from a burning bush, and it happens more often than most of us realize, take off your shoes for the ground on which you stand is holy”. How appropriate, it seems to envision practicing nurses, who must come together with their patients in caring and compassion, as standing on holy ground. God frequently speaks to us from a burning bush, in the fretful whimper of a feverish child, in the anxious questions of a preoperative surgical patient, and in the frail moans of a fragile elder. If we take off our shoes, we will be able to realize that the place where we stand is holy ground; we will respond to our patients as we would wish to respond to God in the burning bush.”

Book_of_Exodus_Chapter_4-5_(Bible_Illustrations_by_Sweet_Media) (1)I believe we should all take off our shoes and experience what is holy in our professions and our human relationships. What are we called to do and what is preventing us from doing it? We should take off our shoes of bias, our shoes of fear, and our shoes of judgment and help alleviate unnecessary suffering. Only then will we be able to feel what is holy and just. Only then can we answer the questions that examine our values:
Who am I? Who am I to become? How do I get there?

Adult Health: Nursing Ethical and Legal Issues

Art by: “Book of Exodus Chapter 4-5 (Bible Illustrations by Sweet Media)” by Distant Shores Media/Sweet Publishing


Access to Cost-Effective Care is Limited by Turf Battles

Have you ever wondered why healthcare is so much more expensive in the United States than other similar countries?  Let me propose that it is partially the fault of Congress, physicians, and other health care providers that are more interested in protecting turf than caring for patients.  In the 1960’s Dr. Loretta Ford and Dr. Henry Silver developed the first Nurse Practitioner (NP) program at the University of Colorado, now referred to as Advanced Practice Registered Nurses.  The purpose was to expand healthcare to those in under served areas and fill gaps.  Nurse Practitioners do this by combining some practice aspects of medicine and some of nursing.  This holistic approach to patient care has been adopted in other countries and has greatly expanded access to care.

What has been shown in repeated studies is that Nurse Practitioners provide high quality and cost-effective care.   There are over 100,000 nurse practitioners in the U.S. and the number is growing.  The problem is that some states significantly limit their practice and require collaborative agreements with physicians.  The impact of this is that it increases cost and decreases the number of nurse practitioners.

There is currently a petition on the White House We the People website that request the barriers to advanced practice registered nurses be removed.   There are only a few days left to sign the petition.  If you care about access to affordable health care then this is important to sign the petition.

https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/remove-barriers-prevent-advanced-practice-registered-nurses-practicing-their-full-scope/WJSdg1P3

We petition the Obama administration to:

Remove barriers that prevent advanced practice registered nurses from practicing to their full scope.

Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) have provided safe and effective care in the United States for over four decades. When the Affordable Care ACT (ACA) is fully implemented in 2014 over 30 million Americans will gain coverage under the law. APRNs currently have barriers to practice which include requirements for being supervised by or having a collaborative agreement with a physician, inability to admit patients into hospice or home health and restrictions on prescription of controlled drugs.There is currently a shortage of primary care physicians and the restriction to APRN practice limits patients access to care. Advanced practice registered nurses should be allowed to practice to their full scope of education and training.